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  • Upcoming Workshops & Events  

    View current ITP Program workshops below. To see past workshops visit our Workshop Archive

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    Truths and Myths About Teams and Their Implications for How We Understand Competence in Healthcare

    Medicine has embraced the notion of "expert teams" as critical to clinical and educational mandates. However, the conventional emphasis on individual competence is ill-suited to creating training and assessing teamwork in clinical and educational settings. Using stories of clinical teamwork to illustrate, this presentation describes some paradoxical truths and persistent myths about healthcare teamwork. Using the concept of “collective competence”, participants will learn ways to create, train, and assess.

    Presenter: Dr. Loerlei Lingard, an internationally renowned Medical Education Researcher

    When: Friday, September 22
    Time: Lunch: 1:00pm – 1:30pm; Presentation: 1:30pm – 3:30pm
    Where: Vancouver Island Convention Centre; Nanaimo, BC

    Register Now! | Click here to see the poster.

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    The Many Faces of Clinical Supervision

    Clinical supervision is a critical feature of health professional education, and one which we expect to bear enormous weight. Clinical supervision must balance patient care and trainee education. It should shape identity and impart ethics. Clinical supervision is a complex social phenomenon, yet our discussions about it – and our faculty development efforts regarding it - tend towards simplification.

    Presenter: Dr. Loerlei Lingard, an internationally renowned Medical Education Researcher

    When: Saturday, September 23
    Time: Breakfast: 8:30am – 9:00am; Presentation: 9:00am – 9:45am; Concept Application: 10:00am – 12:00pm
    Where: University Club, University of Victoria; Victoria, BC

    Register Now! | Click here to see the poster.

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    Are We Training for Collective Incompetence? Three Common Education Assumptions and Their Unintended Impact on Healthcare Teamwork

    Effective healthcare requires effective teamwork. Accordingly, medical education has a mandate to produce not only competent individuals but also competent teams. However, this is proving to be a challenge, given medical education’s strongly individualistic orientation. This presentation will draw on empirical research to illustrate how some of medical education's conventional assumptions constrain our ability to produce competent teams. Three assumptions will be considered: ‘competence’, ‘problem solving’ and ‘teamwork’. In each case, we will consider both what the conventional assumption focuses our attention on (the important contributions it has made to medical education) and what it distracts us from (the blind spots it has created in medical education). Using a short clinical story and empirical research findings, we will consider how to productively reorient ourselves so that we can approach competence, problem solving and teamwork in ways that maximize collective competence.

    Presenter: Dr. Loerlei Lingard, an internationally renowned Medical Education Researcher

    When: Saturday, September 23
    Time: Lunch: 12:00pm – 12:45pm; Presentation: 1:00pm – 1:45pm; Concept Application: 2:00pm – 4:00pm
    Where: University Club, University of Victoria; Victoria, BC

    Register Now! | Click here to see the poster.

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    The Empowered Person: Increasing Student and Patient Self-Efficacy

    It is difficult working with individuals who do not believe they have the ability to experience success.  Often, these people have low self-efficacy.  That is, they judge themselves incapable of organizing or executing the action required to achieve in a given situation (Bandura, 1986).  Substantial empirical research indicates a strong relationship between individuals’ self-efficacy beliefs, their ability to engage in tasks that foster the development of their knowledge and skills, and their ability to exert effort and persist under challenging circumstances.  As such, self-efficacy beliefs are regarded as foundational for human motivation, well-being, and personal accomplishments.  Individuals who have low self-efficacy see little point in persevering if they think they do not have what it takes to succeed. 

    The purpose of this workshop is to give a brief overview of Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory, to describe the key components of self-efficacy, and to discuss the major sources of information used by individuals when forming self-efficacy judgments.  Another goal is to identify how the tenets of self-efficacy have been researched and applied to student achievement in the academic realm, and for patient self-regulation in medical settings.  During the workshop, participants will engage in activities that focus on strategies to increase self-efficacy, so they can help their students and patients become more efficacious in a variety of situations.

    Presenter: Dr. Lucinda Brown

    When: Tuesday, October 3
    Where: Medical Sciences Building (MSB), Room 150, UVic
    Time: Dinner 5:30 – 6:00 pm; Workshop: 6:00  - 8:00 pm

    RSVP date: September 28, 2017

    Register now! | Click here to see the poster.

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    Non-Verbal Communication Skills for Educators

    This practical workshop explores advanced techniques in Non-Verbal Communication (NVC) – commonly referred to as ‘body language’.  Building on the non-verbal topics covered in previous sessions (though attendance at those is not a pre-requisite for this course), topics will include the communicative impact of facial expression, oculesics (eye contact), kinesics (gesture) and proxemics (body position).  As well offering lots of practical activities for participants to become better non-verbal ‘decoders’ (to ‘read’ the non-verbals of students), the workshop will place great emphasis on exploring ways in which Faculty members can develop their professional skills by becoming ‘encoders’ (sending effective non-verbal cues to students), as well as exploring the impact that some elements of nonverbal behaviour have on personal mood and energy levels.

    Presenter: Dr. Jason Cressey

    When: Saturday, October 21, 2017
    Where: University Club, UVic
    When: Breakfast and Registration: 8:30 – 9:00 am; Workshop 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
    RSVP date: October 16, 2017

    Register now! | Click here to see the poster.